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I can instantly tell whether Youtube serves AV1.
GODDAMNIT GOOGLE FIX YOUR SHITTY HACKED-UP RATE CONTROL SYSTEM THE ENCODER BLURS EVERY PIECE OF GRASS TO DEATH

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@lynne the youtube experience is uploading a 5 MB file with a flac audio track and a static picture and ending up with a 2 GB stream with blurry i-frames

@mia Inverse problem with av1. Libaom HUGELY boosts keyframes. Like, way too much, leaving very little bits to stuff like grass.
If you have a slideshow and somehow the scene detector doesn't screw up, you're better off with av1. Otherwise, it's a world of blur and D(C/S)T basis functions.

Usually with those single-picture youtube videos the audio is shot.

@lynne Seems to be the most obvious on older videos that get re-encoded.
@normandy @lynne If it's re-encoding older videos, then it's probably going to be just further lowering quality on the sites worst looking content. Especially if the resolution caps out at 720p, i can see why youtube doesn't call that hd anymore, especially when every device that isn't a low end phone probably has a higher res screen
@Neidhardt @lynne I don't even know if YouTube stores the original un-encoded upload and for how long. If they just re-encode the already processed video, then generational loss obviously becomes a thing.
@normandy @lynne They definitely re-encode videos when they are encoded, but i always assumed they were stored in that format. I'd be surprised if all of youtube is in the same format though, i'd imagine new videos get stored as av1 or vp9, while old stuff was x264 i think

@Neidhardt @normandy Youtube store original uploads.
But only the uploader can access them.

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